Feed management of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei in India

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Feed management of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei in India

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One of the major advantages for L. vannamei is its low protein requirement (35%). In some parts of India a few farmers prefer P. monodon feed with a higher protein level with a misconception that it can reduce culture duration. It is always better to use specially feeding prepared for L. vannamei. Judicial feeding regime is the key to be success in farming. Since many factors are involved in shrimp feed consumption, careful and frequent observation of shrimp is the most reliable approach for determining the optimal feeding amount. The general guidelines for feeding adjustment to be made according to the mean body weight of the shrimp are given in Table 2.

Shrimp are fed at a particular percentage of their body weight ranging from 15% on day 15 to 1.3% on day 130. In order to calculate the quantity of feed required as a percentage of standing crop, regular sampling and assessment of standing crop is done. Standing crop is assessed by cast net method.

Feeding is done four times a day (6am, 12pm, 6pm and 10pm) in equal ration. With proper feed management, 40 count shrimp can be harvested in 90 – 100 days. Mostly the culture duration is 90 – 130 days with an FCR of 1.4 – 1.5, but in some cases this goes up to 150 days (30 count).

Feed tray monitoring

Feed trays are used for assessing the quantity of feed to be given. Feed tray is usually of 0.6m x 0.6m to 0.8m x 0.8m (0.36 to 0.64 m2) with PVC pipes or steel as support having 24 meshes. Feed tray is to be offered while broadcasting feed all along the bunds. Number of trays required for one-hectare pond is about 6. Generally, 1 – 10% of daily ration is kept in these feed trays and these are observed after every 3 hours up to 50 days and thereafter after 2 hours.

Table 2: A model feeding programme for L. vannamei

DOC

ABW

% Feed

% in

check tray

Check time

(hours)

0 – 10

0.03 – 0.25

20 – 17

1 – 2

3

11 – 20

0.3 – 0.8

17 – 13

2 – 3

3

21 – 30

0.9 – 1.8

12 – 9

4 – 5

3

31 – 40

1.9 – 4.0

9 – 6

5

3

41 – 50

4.5 – 6.75

3.5 – 3.2

5

3

51 – 60

7.01 – 9.68

3.2 – 2.8

5 – 6

2.5

61 – 70

10.0 – 12.59

2.8 – 2.7

6 – 7

2

71 – 80

12.86 – 15.11

2.7 – 2.5

8 – 10

2

81 – 90

15.33 – 17.28

2.5 – 2.4

10

2

91 – 100

17.49 – 19.45

2.4 – 2.3

10

2

101 – 110

19.76 – 22.53

2.3 – 2.1

10

2

111 – 120

22.84 – 26.00

2.1 – 2.0

10

2

 

Source: Asian Aquaculture Network Magazine – January/March 2014

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