Probiotic Bacteria as Biological Control Agents in Aquaculture

Back to Posts

Probiotic Bacteria as Biological Control Agents in Aquaculture

: 4623

There is an urgent need in aquaculture to develop microbial control strategies since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and trade and since the development of antibiotic resistance has become a matter of growing concern.

One of the alternatives to antimicrobials in disease control could be the use of probiotic bacteria as microbial control agents. A new definition of probiotics, also applicable to aquatic environments, is proposed, and a detailed description is given of their possible modes of action, i.e., production of compounds that are inhibitory toward pathogens, competition with harmful microorganisms for nutrients and energy, competition with deleterious species for adhesion sites, enhancement of the immune response of the animal, improvement of water quality, and interaction with phytoplankton. A rationale is proposed for the multistep and multidisciplinary process required for the development of effective and safe probiotics for commercial application in aquaculture.

Disease outbreaks are being increasingly recognized as a significant constraint on aquaculture production and trade, affecting the economic development of the sector in many countries. For instance, the disease is now considered to be the limiting factor in the shrimp culture subsector. So far, conventional approaches, such as the use of disinfectants and antimicrobial drugs, have had limited success in the prevention or cure of aquatic disease. Furthermore, there is a growing concern about the use and, particularly, the abuse of antimicrobial drugs not only in human medicine and agriculture but also in aquaculture.

The massive use of antimicrobials for disease control and growth promotion in animals increases the selective pressure exerted on the microbial world and encourages the natural emergence of bacterial resistance (World Health Organization antimicrobial resistance fact sheet 194, http://www.who.int/inf-fs/en/fact194.html). Not only can resistant bacteria proliferate after an antibiotic has killed off the other bacteria, but also they can transfer their resistance genes to other bacteria that have never been exposed to the antibiotic. The subtherapeutic (prophylactic) use of antibiotics related to those used in human medicine or the use of any antimicrobial agent known to select for cross-resistance to antimicrobials used in human medicine could pose a particularly significant hazard to human health.

Source: Microbiology and molecular biology reviews / American for Society for Microbiology

http://mmbr.asm.org/content/64/4/655.full

Share this post

Back to Posts